Why doesn’t afternoon snack always have to be sweet?

Something sweet to go with your afternoon coffee gossip. This culture was cultivated and cultivated in many European countries – and not only at family celebrations and public holidays. In everyday life, it is also very popular to enjoy sweets with a hot drink during an office break or while shopping. In Germany, the hour of cake and cake will come. In the Balkans, especially in Bosnia, people enjoy lokum comfortably. These are small, sweet jelly cubes traditionally flavored with rose. A confection with origins in the Middle East, like our coffee culture.

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On the other hand, in Italy, cookies such as Amaretti or Cantuccini, but also Pasticcini, are small pastries usually filled with cream, sometimes decorated with berries or nuts. Not to mention the many regional specialties in France, you can also eat croissants, be it Kougelhopf from Alsace, Gateau Breton with rum or salted caramel from Brittany, or Tarte Tropézienne special crème.azure from Côte d’Italia.

Mix sweet and salty

That a hearty meal can be delicious in the afternoon is shown above all by a nation not famous for its successes in terms of food culture: the English with tea time. Hearty sandwiches are as much a part of the cake stand as sweet pastries.

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A master of hearty afternoon snacks is Marco D’Andrea, executive chef at Hamburg luxury hotel The Fontenay: “I remember my grandmother’s classic coffee gossip. There were cakes and cookies, but never anything delicious. Over time, the palate became sluggish, sticky and it gets sticky. You just need something refreshing to neutralize it. I would always mix sweet and salty,” advises the 32-year-old.

Make coffee gossip easy

The confectioner even dedicated his book to his passion. At Modern Tea Time, you’ll find creative (and often challenging) recipes for all kinds of sweets, as well as hearty snacks. For example, walnut biscuits topped with a Roquefort raspberry cube. Ligurian bread with porcini mushrooms, chives and truffle pecorino, or wholemeal sandwiches with vaziri and lime.

Bake cakes and make dips and spread breads in addition to buttercream? That sounds like a lot of hard work for homeowners. But D’Andrea assures: “Coffee gossip doesn’t have to be too complicated.” Butternut squash, sandwiches, a piece of smoked salmon, cream cheese, slices of Italian dill, a few salted nuts, olives, sun-dried tomatoes—the pastry chef knows that salty snacks like these also serve a “detox purpose.” will give

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Delicious pastry-like scones

An English teatime classic that’s now hugely popular in this country can be reworked like this: scones. Pastries made from flour, milk, butter, sugar and baking powder are flavored in England with clotted cream and strawberry jam. A look at Coffee & Scones in Hanover shows that hearty options can also be made with simple means: “The idea to also offer delicious options came to us very late. Afterwards, we were surprised at how well it was received,” said operators Lena Lobers and Karina Nickel, who like to bake with cheese. Feta with tomatoes and basil, for example Roquefort with pears, goat cheese with herbs or mountain cheese with pumpkin and curry.

Of course, Coffee & Scones also has sweet options with figs, nuts or berries. Whether sweet or savory – the basic dough is similar. For a heartier version, the cream is replaced with buttermilk, as in Nickel and Lober’s recipe on the right.

Recipe: Herbed Olive Breads

Ingredients (for six to eight doughs):

  • a teaspoon of olive oil
  • three onions, finely chopped
  • 200 grams of flour
  • a spoonful of sugar
  • two teaspoons of baking powder
  • a teaspoon of salt
  • 100 grams of unsalted, ice-cold butter (preferably in the freezer for an hour before cooking)
  • 50 grams of pitted green olives
  • two teaspoons of capers
  • a bunch of parsley
  • 80 grams of cheddar, grated
  • two eggs (size M)
  • 80 grams of buttermilk

For the top:

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Mix cheddar, salt and pepper

Besides:

Round cookie cutter (diameter: eight centimeters)

This is how it works:

1. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees fan. Heat the olive oil in a covered pan. Add the onions. Season with a pinch of salt and cook over medium heat for five minutes until soft and translucent. Remove from the oven. Allow to cool.

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A hearty alternative to cake: scones.

A hearty alternative to cake: scones.

2. Place flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a bowl and mix. Remove the butter from the freezer and grate it into a bowl. Knead gently into the mixture with your hands. Beat one of the two eggs with buttermilk, add to the dough with olives, capers, parsley, cheese and onion. Mix well. Important: Do not knead the dough for too long so that the butter is not too soft.

3. Lightly flour a clean work surface and roll out the dough to a thickness of about 1.5 centimeters. Using a round cutter, cut out six small circles and gather the remaining dough together. Continue until all the dough is used up.

4. Place the buns on parchment paper and brush with beaten egg. Bake in the oven for about 16-18 minutes. Garnish with salt, grated cheddar and pepper, if desired.

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